The New Osage Casino Buffet

By on March 12, 2012

“Please delete those photos or I’ll lose my job!” Osage Casino has a strict no photos rule. If I had the photos I took of the lavish buffet spread, I could write a fine long review. But she seemed a nice lady — in fact all the staff were kind and helpful — and I don’t want to get her fired, so you’ll have to make do with this short description of what could be the best food deal in Tulsa. Every evening there’s a buffet at the Osage Casino. You walk through the hurly burly of a thousand flashing slot machines and enter a quiet little room in back. The setting is about what you’d expect of a high school cafeteria and none of the food is that great. But it’s all quite good (J.G. Lorenzo, their executive chef, has had a lot of experience in hotels and the like) and on weekdays you get as much as you can stuff in your gullet for only $12.

There’s table after table of salad fixins. I skipped that and headed for the meat. My first plate featured a huge slice I cut off a big roast ham, a piece of fried catfish, mac and cheese, and spaghetti bolognese. The spaghetti was there because Monday is Italian food night, and it was quite good. (I skipped the sad, soggy-looking lasagna.) Not what you’d hope for at, say, D’Alesandro’s, but way better than Olive Garden. The mac and cheese was good and gooey, just like what everyone loves at the Brook on Peoria. The ham was adequate (nothing like country ham, but nice flavor). The fried fish was excellent. We got there at 5, when the place opens, and it was fresh from the fryer.

My next two plates were basically reruns. I tried some fried chicken and it wasn’t bad at all but I preferred the fish so I got two more helpings. They did have steaks and roast beef but these were so overcooked that you’d send them back even if you ordered well done. Cathe, meanwhile, made a huge salad and loved it. Then on to dessert.

I had a reddish mousse in a chocolate shell with rum at the bottom, raspberries and blackberries with whipped cream, vanilla pudding, chocolate pudding, and then fresh-baked cherry pie. I put vanilla ice cream from a soft-serve machine on top. By then I was bursting. Not great food by any means but if you’re really hungry it’s a great deal.

Osage Casino
951 W 36 St North (just west of Tisdale Expressway and not that far west of Cincinnati Avenue)
Buffet served daily at 5 PM (it’s $20 on weekends and includes seafood)
http://www.osagecasinos.com/dining/tulsa-menu

Brian Schwartz:

Born in NYC, age 0, on my birthday. College in Oxford at age 16. Law School in New Haven, Conn. 6 years travel in Africa and Asia. Haven’t done much lately. Still, I’m the only Tulsa member of the little-known Omega Society.  www.theomegasociety.com

I speak enough Chinese to order food not on any English menu. Spanish French Italian too (not fluently but food-ently) My favorite restaurant is Jean-Georges in New York. But those NYC chefs would sell their soul to get the produce available from the farms around Inola.

“A writer writes alone. His words tumble forth from a magical inner void that is mysterious even to himself, and that no one else can enter.” And yet, the most important thing to me the writer is YOU. Without you to hear them, my words are worth less than silence.

Brian Schwartz

About Brian Schwartz

Born in NYC, age 0, on my birthday. College in Oxford at age 16. Law School in New Haven, Conn. 6 years travel in Africa and Asia. Haven’t done much lately. Still, I’m the only Tulsa member of the little-known Omega Society. www.theomegasociety.com I speak enough Chinese to order food not on any English menu. Spanish French Italian too (not fluently but food-ently) My favorite restaurant is Jean-Georges in New York. But those NYC chefs would sell their soul to get the produce available from the farms around Inola. “A writer writes alone. His words tumble forth from a magical inner void that is mysterious even to himself, and that no one else can enter.” And yet, the most important thing to me the writer is YOU. Without you to hear them, my words are worth less than silence.

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