Burn Co. BBQ – Rich, Smoky Flavor Straight Off Hasty-Bake Charcoal Ovens

By on April 15, 2011

“We don’t have an oven, we don’t have a stove top, we don’t have a frying pan, we don’t have a toaster,” says Adam Myers, owner of Burn Co BBQ. “Everything you get is cooked on our Hasty-Bake Charcoal Oven.” Adam spent 12 years as a salesman for the Hasty-Bake company, whose offices are less than a mile away. He traveled the country selling grills, checking out local barbecue along the way. In one tiny joint deep in the woods somewhere in north Alabama, he asked for a mixed platter. “Honey, all we got is pork and pork”, said the waitress. The pork was cooked in a homemade smoker set up in a shed. Adam noted the style. He learned a lot of BBQ styles throughout the south. Now, at Burn Co, he uses all he’s learned. And the decor, down to the roll of paper towels at each table, is an homage to places like that Alabama shack.

Hasty-Bake does not mean hasty. It was named after its inventor, Grant Hastings. (Hasty-Bake sounds a lot better than Hastings-Bake.) A soldier in World War II, he dreamed of Tipton’s, his favorite BBQ in Northside Tulsa, and vowed to design a grill that would produce ribs as good as Mr. Tipton ever did. He succeeded. Feed a Hasty-Bake with charcoal and it will grill, bake or smoke your food. It’s not hasty at all, and the baby back ribs served at Burn Co are smoked for about three hours. Here they are.

Definitely delicious, and certainly in the same league as a good Northside BBQ. Adam’s glazed the ribs, and that’s a neat trick because it gives the effect of adding sauce without masking the flavor of the meat. The meat has a nice crust, and a rich smoky flavor. The ribs, which were a daily special at $11, came with a side, and I asked for their famous grilled potato salad. Sold out. It’s TOO famous. So I got the baked beans, and these were exceptional. Baked on the Hasty-Bake, they somehow picked up that aforementioned smoky flavor.

Cathe had a pulled pork sandwich ($4, including one side) and she liked it.

Good flavor — Adam learned from that Alabama joint — and I squeezed on some sauce, which made it better. The cole slaw was great too. BurnCo also sells brisket and bratwurst sandwiches, and I’d bet they are fine.

I was pretty full by now, but Adam wanted to be sure, so he brought over a plate of BBQ chicken for dessert.

Delicious. A great way to end the meal. Now if only they were open for dinner…

Burn Co BBQ
3208 E. 11st St.
237-9151
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Burn-Co-Barbecue/112326495508154
LUNCH ONLY
Open Tues. through Sat. 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM

Burn Co BBQ on Urbanspoon

Brian Schwartz: Author

Born in NYC, age 0, on my birthday. College in Oxford at age 16. Law School in New Haven, Conn. 6 years travel in Africa and Asia. Haven’t done much lately. Still, I’m the only Tulsa member of the little-known Omega Society.  www.theomegasociety.com

I speak enough Chinese to order food not on any English menu. Spanish French Italian too (not fluently but food-ently) My favorite restaurant is Jean-Georges in New York. But those NYC chefs would sell their soul to get the produce available from the farms around Inola.

“A writer writes alone. His words tumble forth from a magical inner void that is mysterious even to himself, and that no one else can enter.” And yet, the most important thing to me the writer is YOU. Without you to hear them, my words are worth less than silence.

Brian Schwartz

About Brian Schwartz

Born in NYC, age 0, on my birthday. College in Oxford at age 16. Law School in New Haven, Conn. 6 years travel in Africa and Asia. Haven’t done much lately. Still, I’m the only Tulsa member of the little-known Omega Society. www.theomegasociety.com I speak enough Chinese to order food not on any English menu. Spanish French Italian too (not fluently but food-ently) My favorite restaurant is Jean-Georges in New York. But those NYC chefs would sell their soul to get the produce available from the farms around Inola. “A writer writes alone. His words tumble forth from a magical inner void that is mysterious even to himself, and that no one else can enter.” And yet, the most important thing to me the writer is YOU. Without you to hear them, my words are worth less than silence.

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